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What's New - Pictorial Reports of New Developments
April 1961 Radio-Electronics

April 1961 Radio-Electronics

April 1961 Radio-Electronics Cover - RF Cafe[Table of Contents]

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from Radio-Electronics, published 1930-1988. All copyrights hereby acknowledged.

For a few years, Radio-Electronics magazine ran a regular feature entitled "What's New - Pictorial Reports of New Developments," usually consisting of four or five photos of recent events, discoveries, inventions, etc., in the wireless realm. This April 1961 issue was published in the era when solid state devices were rapidly replacing vacuum tubes, so there was always something mentioned about a transistor, diode, or even an integrated circuit. Antenna developments appeared frequently, as did computer and display technologies. That 8-segment display shown is not and LED, as it appears to be. It is an electroluminescent device called a Rayescent panel, made by Westinghouse (note the Mercury dime used to indicate the size). The only LEDs available in 1961 were infrared emitters, and those were laboratory models. Optical wavelength LEDs became commercially available in the mid-1960s.

Pictorial Reports of New Developments

End-Fire Antenna at Wallops Space Flight Station will be used to receive telemetry information from rockets being tested at the Virginia installation. Designed and built by CB Electronics Corp., Valley Stream, N. Y., the antenna has 33 end-fire elements.

Siamese-Twin Transistor - two silicon units with a common collector in one package - is well suited for dc-to-ac conversion. A typical application for this RCA device will be to step up the standard 12-volt DC auto battery to 117 volts to operate common electrical devices.

Luminescent Readout Lamps are designed to display letters and words on stock quotation boards, time and temperature indicators, travel schedule indicators and similar devices. The large 4-inch-high letters can be read at distances up to 150 feet. The Rayescent panels are made by Westinghouse.

Battle Data Display consoles to be installed aboard the Navy's newest carriers and missile ships will give a quick graphic picture of the task force's entire tactical situation. The displays male it possible for the commander to have a minute to minute picture of the situation on coordinating the operation, according to Hughes Aircraft, which makes the equipment.

 

 

Posted May 22, 2023

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Copyright:
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Webmaster:

Kirt Blattenberger,

BSEE | KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The World Wide Web (Internet) was largely an unknown entity at the time and bandwidth was a scarce commodity. Dial-up modems blazed along at 14.4 kbps while tying up your telephone line, and a nice lady's voice announced "You've Got Mail" when a new message arrived...

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