Giant Tube to Supply Water for Ten Millions
August 1937 Popular Mechanics

August 1937 Popular Mechanics
August 1937 Popular Mechanics - RF Cafe[Table of Contents]

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early mechanics and electronics. See articles from Popular Mechanics, published continuously since 1902. All copyrights hereby acknowledged.

A few weeks ago, a stack of about 60 issues of vintage Popular Mechanics, Mechanix Illustrated, and Popular Science magazines were discovered at an estate sale for $20. An equivalent cache on eBay would cost around $120-$150 plus shipping. Although a lot of the content does not pertain to electronics, it is all technology related and I figure a much will be of interest to RF Cafe visitors. This piece from the August 1937 issue of Popular Mechanics is a prime example. It was the intracacy and complexity of the line drawings that caught my attention. Shown is the very extensive scheme devised to supply New York City with an abundant water supply. The Delaware Aqueduct, when complete, would supply 1.5 billion gallons of water to residents and businesses. The anticipated cost was $272 million, which in 2023 money is equivalent to $5.736 billion (a 2100% inflation in 86 years). That's probably about what a similar current-day project would cost. What is really profound about the undertaking is the scale of everything and that such huge holes and tunnels could be excavated back then, as well as the enormousness of the water control valves, and the machines needed to control them. The point where supply pipes enter the city are 500 feet below sea level, running under the Hudson River. Keep in mind the people who achieved this and so many other colossal feats of engineering and construction when you hear or read about groups of agitators who claim to have built the modern world while disparaging those who really got the job done - with many being killed or maimed in the process. Don't let you kids be taught otherwise in school.

 

Giant Tube to Supply Water for Ten Millions

New York's $272,587,000 Delaware Aqueduct

New York's $272,587,000 Delaware aqueduct, designed to supply ten million persons with water within ten years, is begun with driving of a shaft, fourteen feet in diameter, which pierces a mountain. Upper left, note how use of water increased as price dropped. Other drawings show features of the shaft which will tap the water supply in a giant tunnel. Massive concrete construction will protect water system from bombs dropped by enemy planes.

Eighty-Five Mile Tunnel Taps Vast Watershed

One and one-half billion gallons of water each day from the Catskill mountains

Tapping a vast watershed, the huge tunnel will convey by gravity one and one-half billion gallons of water each day from the Catskill mountains to New York, a distance of eighty-five miles. The greatest diameter of the tunnel will be nineteen and one-half feet. In map at ,top, note various sources which have been tapped and spot from which 160 million gallons more per day may be drawn when the population warrants such an extension.

 

 

Posted August 10, 2023