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Heathkit DX-60B Amateur Radio Transmitter Restoration
by Gary Steinhour, KF6U
Kirt's Cogitations™ #285

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 Heathkit DX-60B by Gary Steinhour- RF Cafe

Long-time RF Cafe visitor and occasional contributor Gary Steinhour, KF6U, recently sent me a note saying he had acquired a very used Heathkit DX-60B amateur radio transmitter and was in the process of restoring it. Gary's first transmitter as a freshly minted Ham half a century ago was a DX-60, so this was an effort to satisfy a nostalgic emotional attachment. The project is complete now, and boy does it look nice! Gary provides a brief account here:

"There are no problems, just creative opportunities," was a favorite saying of senior high speed optics physicist George Carpluk. Those of us who endeavor to restore our beloved boat anchors are presented with a wide variety of "creative opportunities".

Original front panel Heathkit DX-60B by Gary Steinhour- RF Cafe

Original back side Heathkit DX-60B by Gary Steinhour- RF Cafe

All the Restored Components Heathkit DX-60B by Gary Steinhour- RF Cafe

Restored Front Panel & Chassis Bottom, Heathkit DX-60B by Gary Steinhour- RF Cafe

During a friendly visit with a local ham, Larry KK6MF, I mentioned I enjoy trying to bring an old boat anchor back to life. Larry said he had an old Heath DX-60B that needed some TLC and I was welcome to have it. Later that day he contacted me to let me know he located it and was ready for me to pick it up. When I saw it I realized it was abundant with creative opportunities. I felt compelled to revive it since I had recently passed the 50 year mark of being a ham and my first station consisted of a Heath DX-60 with matching HR-10 receiver.

It was obvious generations of mice made a home in it. The bottom cover was missing and they nibbled on the various components. My only option was to totally dismantle it and do a total rebuild after giving it a thorough cleaning and replacing damaged components.

I thought it would be a show stopper when I discovered the band switch was broken. Can't order one from Heath anymore. Luckily I discovered there are folks selling parts from dismantled radios on eBay. The band switch I needed just happened to be available, and at a reasonable price too. I thought the flux capacitor I needed was going to be difficult to find as well, but as luck would have it, there was one in the retro-encabulator I purchased at a garage sale this past April 1st.

While I was in the reconstruction process, I noticed there was a local listing of a Heath HR-10B receiver on Craig's List. Now is that a strange coincidence or what? At first I resisted buying it, but then I learned resistance was futile. Yep, I got it. And it works too. It actually came in handy. The receiver and transmitter are the same size, so I was able to use the receiver's bottom cover plate as a template to fabricate a cover plate for the transmitter.

Following Heath's step by step instructions during the rebuild was a wonderful déjà vu experience. It generated RF without any smoke!

Note: I used WD-40 to clean the front panel and cabinet. It is a mild solvent that is paint friendly. The painted finish is original. No touch-ups. The chassis is bare steel. I used a wire brush wheel on my electric drill to clean up the rust and contamination build-up. Soaking the nuts and bolts in vinegar dissolved some of the rust. I used a small wire brush clean what the vinegar didn't dissolve.

73, Gary KF6U

Restored Electronics Chassis Heathkit DX-60B by Gary Steinhour- RF Cafe

Heathkit DX-60B Amateur Radio Transmitter

See catalog page and user's manual

Heathkit HR-10 Amateur Radio Receiver

See catalog page and user's manual

 

 

Posted June 9, 2017


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