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Neverware Juicebox - New Life for Old Computers

Neverware Juicebox - New Life for Old Computers - RF CafeRemember the old adage about not throwing away that wide tie because someday it will be back in style? Well, the good folks at Neverware have built a business model and product that exploits that concept. "Neverware installs powerful software on schools' existing computers, taking over the 'heavy lifting' and allowing the computers to run like new. Neverware's servers can supercharge any PC - even if it's ten years old and missing its hard drive." Those of us who have been using computers since the 1970s ['78 for me] know this system as a network with dumb terminals. The main difference between then and now is wireless connectivity rather than copper cables. Calling the server a "Juicebox" helps the sales pitch and with cinching the deal - it sounds trendy. I have long predicted that the "personal" computer in business and other large networks like in schools and government offices would eventually come full circle back to the dumb terminal system. Doing so eliminates - or at least makes much more difficult - scenarios like where Edward Snowden simply plugs a thumb drive into the USB port and walks away with sensitive data that probably has already gotten or will at some point get someone killed. It also protects against malicious software and makes deployment, maintenance, and user restrictions much simpler and cost effective.

If you fit the right "requirements," you can get a contract for just about anything from the government these days. Being a WASP male myself, my chances are almost nil, but here's an idea for someone else more innately qualified: Why not take this idea a bit farther and resurrect the typewriter for government offices? You could offer a package deal that also includes a flatbed scanner with OCR software that connects to a wireless network. All I ask in return is to please remember me in your will.

Posted  December 2, 2013

 

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About RF Cafe

Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe Webmaster

Copyright: 1996 - 2024

Webmaster:

    Kirt Blattenberger,

    BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The World Wide Web (Internet) was largely an unknown entity at the time and bandwidth was a scarce commodity. Dial-up modems blazed along at 14.4 kbps while tying up your telephone line, and a nice lady's voice announced "You've Got Mail" when a new message arrived...

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