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Copyright 1999-2030

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Fada 103 Fadalette, Stewart-Warner Series 108, DeWald 54 Dynette Sets
Radio Service Data Sheets
May 1933 Radio-Craft

May 1933 Radio-Craft

May 1933 Radio Craft Cover - RF Cafe[Table of Contents]

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from Radio-Craft, published 1929 - 1953. All copyrights are hereby acknowledged.

Fada 103 Fadalette, RadioMuseum.org - RF CafeEven in the early days of radio, some big-name manufacturers built versions of their sets for the purpose of re-branding by another company. Sears, Western Auto, Montgomery Ward, JC Penny, and others had the own radio lines made by someone else. Here is an instance where three radios - at least their electronics chassis - had identical (or nearly so) innards. As was common at the time with AC/DC sets, one terminal of the AC power line attached to the metal chassis as a common voltage reference, which meant there was a 50-50 chance that the nonpolarized plug would be inserted into the wall socket in a manner that connected the chassis to 120 VAC rather than to ground (neutral). Everything on the outside was electrically isolated, by nonconductive components (enclosure, knobs, switches), but many an unwitting radio owner got shocked when attempting to service the set while it was plugged in (even if just removing or inserting vacuum tubes). Designers eventually devised means of totally isolating the metal parts - like installing a traffic light at an intersection after enough people died in accidents there.

Fada 103 Fadalette, Stewart-Warner Series 108, DeWald 54 Dynette Sets Radio Service Data Sheets

Fada 103 Fadalette, Stewart-Warner Series 108, DeWald 54 Dynette Sets Radio Service Data Sheet, May 1933 Radio-Craft - RF CafeFada 103 Fadalette: A tabulation of voltages in this set on D.C. The D.C. and A.C. readings are for a 110 V. line. Bias readings are taken across respective bias resistors. The D.C. input is 34 W., and the A.C., S6 W. Stewart-Warner Companion Chassis Series 108 and 108-X, Models 10 to 20. With the volume control tuned full on, the following approximate voltages should be read to the frame of unit C (using a high resistance voltmeter).

All sets of the "universal current" type now on the market require that the Service Man check the position of the power plug in its socket to determine whether it is correctly poled. It is seldom that the chassis frame connects directly to the power line. Circuit oscillation at the high-sensitivity setting of the volume control is normal in many models. The results obtained with ultra-midget sets will greatly depend upon local reception conditions.

 

 

Posted November 23, 2023
(updated from original post on 5/25/2016)


Radio Service Data Sheets

These schematics, tuning instructions, and other data are reproduced from my collection of vintage radio and electronics magazines. As back in the era, similar schematic and service info was available for purchase from sources such as SAMS Photofacts, but these printings were a no-cost bonus for readers. There are 227 Radio Service Data Sheets as of December 28, 2020.

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About RF Cafe

Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe Webmaster

Copyright:
1996 - 2024

Webmaster:

Kirt Blattenberger,

BSEE | KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The World Wide Web (Internet) was largely an unknown entity at the time and bandwidth was a scarce commodity. Dial-up modems blazed along at 14.4 kbps while tying up your telephone line, and a nice lady's voice announced "You've Got Mail" when a new message arrived...

Copyright  1996 - 2026

All trademarks, copyrights, patents, and other rights of ownership to images and text used on the RF Cafe website are hereby acknowledged.

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