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Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe WebmasterCopyright
1996 - 2016
Webmaster:
Kirt Blattenberger,
 BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The Internet was still largely an unknown entity at the time and not much was available in the form of WYSIWYG ...

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Explain Radio Fading to the Public
September 1942 Radio Retailing Today Article

September 1942 Radio Retailing Today

Radio Retailing Today, September 1942 Cover - RF Cafe[Table of Contents]

These articles are scanned and OCRed from old editions of the Radio & Television News magazine. Here is a list of the Radio & Television News articles I have already posted. All copyrights are hereby acknowledged.

This is a great primer for anyone looking for an easily understandable way to explain the basics of radio signal fading to acquaintances, or for that matter to understand it yourself if you don't already. As I review the material for taking my amateur radio General Class exam, there is information about atmospheric absorption in the various ionospheric layers during daytime and nighttime. Prior to studying the manual, I either never knew or once knew but have forgotten about the upper F1 and F2 layers combining into a single layer at night when the sun's radiation and particle bombardment is blocked by the earth. This article doesn't go that deep into the physics, but it does a good job of making a complex topic simple enough for the layman  - although if you're trying to explain fading to politicians, well, don't even bother.
Explain Radio Fading to the Public
Explain Radio Fading to the Public, September 1942 Radio Retailing Today - RF CafeNeither Radio Sets Nor Station to Blame for After-Dark Distortion

Beginning this month, Nature will again be giving broadcast listeners extraordinary reception. After nightfall, the whole broadcast spectrum will again be filled with far-off stations, many of them roaring in as strong as "locals."

This means that our radio-reflecting-layer, 100 miles up in the sky, is working as an excellent radio mirror again.*
But such "good reception," as we enjoy at present, also brings some annoying troubles to broadcast listeners. These are twofold:

Two Kinds of Trouble

1. Distant stations come in strong, right alongside familiar local stations, and so cause crosstalk and "monkey chatter" on familiar local channels.

2. Nearby high-power stations (60 to 100 miles away) have their sky waves so strongly reflected by the excellent sky mirror, that their reflected waves (traveling a path 150 miles longer) reach the listener out-of-step with the same station's direct-wave he ordinarily hears. This conflict of the two sets of waves, if of equal strength, may produce annoying total fading. Or, certain audible frequencies may be suppressed, so that at intervals the announcer "sounds as if he had a mouthful of hot mush," and a fine orchestra tinkles like a Chinese band!

Too Much of a Good Thing!

Broadcast listeners hearing such interference, usually blame their sets.

But neither the set nor the broadcast station is at fault! Nor is the set maker, the dealer or the radio repairman!

Nature herself is to blame, by temporarily making her reception conditions too good, - so that we suffer from the spillover. Fortunately, the trouble occurs only after dark, and usually for limited periods.

Try This Solution

A very long antenna, or a pickup from telephone wires will sometimes help at the receiving end. This affords pickup from a number of points, so that fading at anyone point is neutralized.

Or the listener can tune to stations less than 60 miles distant, whose reception is unimpaired. He also will find during such distortion periods that he has new and almost unlimited choices among stations over 150 miles away, for on such nights these distant broadcasters, including many never before heard, will be found coming in like locals.

"This is to be expected, now that sunspots are at a minimum in their 11-year cycle. for it is the electron projectiles from the sunspots which shatter the radio mirror and so interfere with long-distance reception.




Posted  September 4, 2013