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Satellites on the Air
December 1962; March, April , May, and June1963 Popular Electronics

December 1962 Popular Electronics

December 1962 Popular Electronics Cover - RF Cafe[Table of Contents]People old and young enjoy waxing nostalgic about and learning some of the history of early electronics. Popular Electronics was published from October 1954 through April 1985. All copyrights (if any) are hereby acknowledged.

By late 1962, the United States was launching new satellites at a very rapid pace. Many were destroyed on the launch pad, others never turned on once in orbit, still more turned on and operated in a crippled form and/or only for a small portion of their intended lifespans. It was a learning period for the entire satellite, rocket, mission control, Earth-based tracking stations, and the communications equipment that dialoged with the satellites. The "race" part of the Space Race moniker was literal. Popular Electronics, QST, Electronics World, and other electronics communications publications regularly printed a list of newly commissioned satellites. The lists presented here came from five different 1962-1963 editions of Popular Electronics. The feature was repeated for many years. Incidentally, the "mc" frequency unit used at the time was the common abbreviation for "million cycles per second." In 1960, the Hertz was adopted by the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) (Conférence générale des poids et mesures) to replace cycles per second (cps). About a decade was required to get most people to use Hz as the base frequency unit; old habits die hard.

See all articles from Popular Electronics

Satellites on hte Air, Popular Electronics - RF Cafe    Satellites on the Air

December 1962 March 1963 April 1963 May 1963 June 1963

The following satellites, launched by the United States and the Soviet Union, were reported to have beacon and telemetry transmissions as of October 10, 1962. The satellites are listed by their code names, according to frequency; because some transmit on more than one frequency, they appear more than once.

Explorer VII
19.990 mc.

Discoverer XXXVI
20.005 mc.

Transit IVA
54.000 mc.

Courier IB
107.970 mc.

TIROS I
107.997 mc.

TIROS III
108.000 mc.

Vanguard I*
108.024 mc.

TIROS III
108.030 mc.

Telstar
136.050 mc.

Transit IVA
136.200 mc.

TIROS IV
136.230 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI
136.235 mc.

Explorer XIV
136.440 mc.

Injun SR-3
136.500 mc.

Traac*
136.650 mc.

OSO I
136.744 mc.

Transit IVB
136.800 mc.

TIROS IV
136.920 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI
136.922 mc.

Alouette
136.979 mc.

Transit IVA
150.000 mc.

Transit IIA
161.990 mc.

Transit IIA
215.990 mc.

Midas IV
228.200 mc.

Midas IV
232.400 mc.

 

*Signal may be very weak

At least four more satellites are in orbit and may be transmitting. However, these are so-called "secret" satellites launched by the U.S. Air Force.

If you're interested in eavesdropping on satellites, and missed our June 1962 article on the NASA-136 converter, we recommend that you look it up. Easy to construct, this sensitive converter can intercept the satellites operating in the 136-137 mc. band .

 

Satellites on the Air, December 1962 - RF Cafe

The following satellites, launched by the United States, were reported to have beacon and telemetry transmissions as of January 15, 1963 The satellites are listed by their code names, according to frequency; because some transmit on more than one frequency, they appear more than once

Transit IVA
54.000 mc.

Courier IB
107.970 mc.

TIROS I
107.997 mc.

TIROS III
108.000 mc.

Vanguard 1*
108.024 mc.

TIROS III
108.030 mc.

Telstar
136.050 mc.

Explorer XV
136.101 mc.

Relay I
136.140 mc.

Transit IVA
136.200 mc.

Explorer XVI
136.200 mc.

TIROS IV
136.230 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI
136.235 mc.

Ariel
136.408 mc.

Explorer XIV
136.440 mc.

Injun SR·3
136.500 mc.

Alouette
136.590 mc.

Relay I
136.620 mc.

Traac*
136.650 mc.

OSO I
136.744 mc.

Transit IVB
136.800 mc.

Anna
136.815 mc.

Explorer XVI
136.860 mc.

TIROS IV
136.920 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI
136.922 mc.

Alouette
136.979 mc.

Transit IVA
150.000 mc.

Transit VA
150.000 mc.

Transit IIA
161.990 mc.

Transit IIA
215.990 mc.

Midas IV
228.200 mc.

Midas IV
232.400 mc.

Transit VA
400.000 mc.

 

*Signal may be very weak

There are several more satellites in orbit and may be transmitting However, these are so-called "secret" satellites launched by the U S Air Force

If you're interested in eavesdropping on satellites, and missed our June 1962 article on the NASA-136 converter, we recommend that you look it up Easy to construct, this sensitive converter can intercept the satellites operating in the 136-137 mc band

 

Satellites on the Air, March 1963 - RF Cafe

The following satellites, launched by the United States, were reported to have beacon and telemetry transmissions as of February 12, 1963. The satellites are listed by their code names, according to frequency; because some transmit on more than one frequency, they appear more than once.

Transit IVA
54.000 mc.

Courier IB
107.970 mc.

TIROS I
107.997 mc.

TIROS III
108.000 mc.

Vanguard I*
108.024 mc.

TIROS III
108.030 mc.

Telstar
136.050 mc.

Explorer XV
136.101 mc.

Relay I
136.140 mc.

Transit IVA
136.200 mc.

Explorer XVI
136.200 mc.

TIROS IV
136.230 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI
136.235 mc.

Ariel
136.408 mc.

Explorer XIV
136.440 mc.

Injun SR-3
136.500 mc.

Alouette
136.590 mc.

Relay I
136.620 mc.

Traac*
136.650 mc.

OSO I
136.744 mc.

Transit IVB
136.800 mc.

Anna IB
136.815 mc.

Explorer XVI
136.858 mc.

TIROS IV
136.920 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI
136.922 mc.

Alouette
136.979 mc.

Transit IVA
150.000 mc.

Transit VA
150.000 mc.

Transit IIA
161.990 mc.

Transit IIA
215.990 mc.

Midas IV
228.200 mc.

Midas IV
232.400 mc.

Transit VA
400.000 mc.

 

*Signal may be very weak

There are several more satellites in orbit which may be transmitting. However, these are so-called "secret" satellites launched by the U.S. Air Force.

If you're interested in eavesdropping on satellites, and missed our June 1962 article on the NASA-136 converter, we recommend that you look it up. Easy to construct, this sensitive converter can intercept the satellites operating in the 136-137 mc. band.

 

Satellites on the Air, April 1963 - RF Cafe

The following satellites, launched by the United States, were reported to have beacon and telemetry transmissions as of March 13. 1963. The satellites are listed by their code names, according to frequency; because some transmit on more than one frequency. they appear more than once.

Transit IVA
54.000 mc.

Courier IB
107.970 mc.

TIROS I
107.997 mc.

TIROS III
108.000 mc.

Vanguard 1*
108.024 mc.

TIROS III
108.030 mc.

Telstar
136.050 mc.

Explorer XV
136.101 mc.

Relay I
136.140 mc.

Transit IVA
136.200 mc.

Explorer XVI
136.200 mc.

TIROS IV
136.230 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI
136.235 mc.

Ariel
136.408 mc.

Explorer XIV
136.440 mc.

Injun SR-3
136.500 mc.

Alouette
136.590 mc.

Relay I
136.620 mc.

Traac*
136.650 mc.

OSO I
136.744 mc.

Transit IVB
136.800 mc.

Anna IB
136.815 mc.

Explorer XVI
136.858 mc.

TIROS IV
136.920 mc.

TIROS V and TIROS VI 
136.922 mc.

Alouette
136.979 mc.

Transit IVA
150.000 mc.

Transit VA
150.000 mc.

Transit IIA
161.990 mc.

Transit IIA
215.990 mc.

Midas IV
228.200 mc.

Midas IV
232.400 mc.

Transit VA
400.000 mc.

 

*Signal may be very weak

There are several more satellites in orbit which may be transmitting. However, these are so-called "secret" satellites launched by the U.S. Air Force.

If you're interested in eavesdropping on satellites, and missed our June 1962 article on the NASA-136 converter, we recommend that you look it up. Easy to construct, this sensitive converter can intercept the satellites operating in the 136-137 mc. band.

 

Satellites on the Air, May 1963 - RF Cafe

The following satellites, launched by the United States, were reported to have beacon and telemetry transmissions as of April 17, 1963. The satellites are listed by their code names, according to frequency; because some transmit on more than one frequency, they appear more than once.

Transit 4A
54.000 mc.

Vanguard 1*
108.023 mc.

Relay 1
136.140 mc.

Transit 4A
136.200 mc.

Explorer 16**
136.200 mc.

Tiros 4
136.230 mc.

Tiros 6
136.233 mc.

Tiros 5
136.234 mc.

Explorer 17**
136.317 mc.

Ariel
136.407 mc.

Explorer 14
136.440 mc.

Explorer 17
136.560 mc.

Alouette**
136.593 mc.

Relay 1
136.620 mc.

OSO I
136.744 mc.

Anna 1B
136.815 mc.

Explorer 16
136.860 mc.

Injun 3**
136.860 mc.

Tiros 6
136.922 mc.

Tiros 5
136.923 mc.

Anna 1B
136.975 mc.

Alouette
136.979 mc.

Transit 4A
150.000 mc.

Anna 1B
162.000 mc.

 

*Transmits only while satellite is in sunlight - no battery power

**Transmits only upon command from ground stations - not during every pass

Satellites of the Soviet Union have telemetry and tracking transmissions in the 19.990 - 20.010 mc. band. Whenever a Cosmos series satellite is launched, check Radio Moscow for an announcement of tracking frequencies. Most Cosmos series satellites re-enter the atmosphere in 60-90 days. Cosmos 2, 5, and 8 are in orbit at press time, but do not seem to be transmitting.

If you're interested in eavesdropping on satellites, and missed our June 1962 article on the NASA-136 converter, we recommend that you look it up. Easy to construct, this sensitive converter can intercept the satellites operating in the 136-137 mc. band.

 

Satellites on the Air, June 1963 - RF Cafe

 

 

 

 

Posted  March 30, 2014

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