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Citizens Band (CB) Radio Ads
May 1967 Popular Electronics

May 1967 Popular Electronics

May 1965 Popular Electronics Cover - RF Cafe  Table of Contents

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from Popular Electronics, published October 1954 - April 1985. All copyrights are hereby acknowledged.

All About CB Two-Way Radio (Radio Shack) - RF CafeAlthough "Citizens Band" (CB) is the common reference to these unlicensed two-way radio service transceivers, the official name for the spectrum allocated by the FCC to their operation is "Citizens Band Radio Service" (CBRS). It was originally called just "Citizens Radio Service," but the popular use of "Band" caused the FCC to incorporate the additional term later on. Early Part 95 Class D citizens band radios offered up to 23 channels in the 11-meter band from 26.965 MHz through 27.255 MHz. CB radio channels increased to 40 in 1977 due to the immense popularity at the time (long before cellphones) - recall the "Convoy" song. The 11−meter band was re−allocated from the amateur radio spectrum in 1958 (to the great dismay of Hams). CB radios are still used heavily by truckers who don't like the idea of "Big Brother" listening to and recording conversations and identifying metadata from cellphone calls. As mentioned in other articles, the first radio control (R/C) system I owned operated at 27.195 MHz, which was embedded within the CB band, and was often subject to CB interference. I bought my first CB radio in 1976 (senior year in high school) and installed it in my 1969 Chevy Camaro SS. A radio operator's license was required at the time, and I paid $4 for mine; a year earlier the cost was still $20. Not wanting to mount the antenna to a painted surface, I placed it on the rear bumper - one of the most non-ideal locations due to its lack of an omnidirectional radiation pattern. My chosen "handle" (on-the-air nickname) was "Aquila," chosen in reference to my radio-controlled sailplane of that name (see aquila bird). The FCC actually assigned a set of call letters that was supposed to be announced at the beginning and end of all communications (Ham operators must announce call sign every ten minutes), but most people did not do so. Come to think of it, I don't remember ever reading up on the regulations - I just hooked up the radio and put the pedal to the metal. Guilty as charged.

CB Radio Ads

 

Regency Citizens Band (CB) Radio Advertisement - RF cafe   Citi-Fone Citizens Band (CB) Radio Advertisement - RF cafe   Squires Sanders Citizens Band (CB) Radio Advertisement - RF cafe

Hallicrafters Citizens Band (CB) Radio Advertisement - RF cafe   Courier Communications Citizens Band (CB) Radio Advertisement - RF cafe   B&K Citizens Band (CB) Radio Advertisement - RF cafe

C.W. McCall's "Convoy"  -  Lyrics here

 

 

Posted December 31, 2018

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RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The Internet was still largely an unknown entity at the time and not much was available in the form of WYSIWYG ...

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