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Metric Tap & Drill Chart

The twist drill bit was invented by Steven A. Morse of East Bridgewater, MA, in 1861. He received U.S. Patent 38,119 for his invention on April 7, 1863. The original method of manufacture was to cut two grooves in opposite sides of a round bar, then to twist the bar to produce the helical flutes. This gave the tool its name.

Nowadays, the drill bit is usually made by rotating the bar while moving it past a grinding wheel to cut the flutes in the same manner as cutting helical gears. Tools recognizable as twist drill bits are currently produced in diameters covering a range from 0.05 mm (0.002") to 100 mm (4"). Lengths up to about 1000 mm (39") are available for use in powered hand tools.

The geometry and sharpening of the cutting edges is crucial to the performance of the bit. Users often throw away small bits that become blunt, and replace them with new bits, because they are inexpensive and sharpening them well is difficult. For larger bits, special grinding jigs are available. A special tool grinder is available for sharpening or reshaping cutting surfaces on twist drills to optimize the drill for a particular material. -Wikipedia

Standard metric tap & drill size chart


Coarse Thread Fine Thread
Thread
Size
Tap Drill
Diameter
(mm)
Thread
Size
Tap Drill
Diameter
(mm)
M1x0.250.75M4x0.353.6
M1.1x0.250.85M4x0.53.5
M1.2x0.250.95M5x0.54.5
M1.4x0.31.1M6x.55.5
M1.6x0.351.25M6x.755.25
M1.7x0.351.3M7x.756.25
M1.8x0.351.45M8x.57
M2x0.41.6M8x.757.25
M2.2x0.451.75M8x17.5
M2.5x0.452.05M9x18
M3x0.52.5M10x0.759.25
M3.5x0.62.9M10x19
M4x0.73.3M10x1.258.8
M4.5x0.753.7M11x110
M5x0.84.2M12x.7511.25
M6x15M12x111
M7x16M12x1.510.5
M8x1.256.8M14x113
M9x1.257.8M14x1.2512.8
M10x1.58.5M14x1.512.5
M11x1.59.5M16x115
M12x1.7510.2M16x1.514.5
M14x212M18x117
M16x214M18x216
M18x2.515.5M20x119
M20x2.517.5M20x1.518.5
M22x2.519.5M20x218
M24x321M22x121
M27x324M22x1.520.5
M30x3.526.5M22x220
M33x3.529.5M24x1.522.5
M36x432M24x222
M39x435M26x1.524.5
M42x4.537.5M27x1.525.5
M45x4.540.5M27x225
M48x543M28x1.526.5
M52x547M30x1.528.5
M56x5.550.5M30x228
M60x5.554.5M33x231
M64x658M36x333
M68x660M39x336

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