Day in Engineering History Archive - March 25

March 25

Happy Birthday Fleeming Jenkin! Click here to return to the RF Cafe homepage.Day in Engineering History March 25 Archive - RF Cafe1655: Christiaan Huygens discovered Titan, Saturn's largest moon. 1833: Fleeming Jenkin, noted for his work in establishing units of electrical measurement, was born. 1865: French physicist Pierre-Ernest Weiss, who determined the Weiss magneton unit of magnetic moment, was born. 1923: Kenneth Franklin, who along with Bernard Burke in 1955 discovered that Jupiter emits radio waves, was born. 1925: John Logie Baird held the first public demonstration of his television system at the Selfridges department store, Oxford Street, London. 1928: Jim Lovell, commander of the Apollo 11 moon mission, was born 1951: Harold Ewen and Edward Purcell first detected the 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way. 1954: RCA announced production of the first color television sets (CT-100). 1960: A guided missile (Regulus I) was first launched from a nuclear powered submarine (Halibut). 1961: Sputnik 10 carried a dog into (and back from) Earth orbit. 1970: The Concord SST (#002) flew for the first time on Mach 1. 1992: British scientists discovered a new largest perfect number, 2756838*(2756839-1). 1997: Former President George Bush, at age 72, parachuted from a plane over the Arizona desert.

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Note: These historical tidbits have been collected from various sources, mostly on the Internet. As detailed in this article, there is a lot of wrong information that is repeated hundreds of times because most websites do not validate with authoritative sources. On RF Cafe, events with hyperlinks have been verified. Many years ago, I began commemorating the birthdays of notable people and events with special RF Cafe logos. Where available, I like to use images from postage stamps from the country where the person or event occurred. Images used in the logos are often from open source websites like Wikipedia, and are specifically credited with a hyperlink back to the source where possible. Fair Use laws permit small samples of copyrighted content.