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About RF Cafe

Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe WebmasterCopyright
1996 - 2016
Webmaster:
Kirt Blattenberger,
 BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The Internet was still largely an unknown entity at the time and not much was available in the form of WYSIWYG ...

All trademarks, copyrights, patents, and other rights of ownership to images and text used on the RF Cafe website are hereby acknowledged.

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Climbing to the Top of a 1,786-ft Tower
Videos for Engineers

RF Cafe Video for Engineers - Climbing to the Top of a 1796-foot TowerAt 1,730 ft (527 m) to the tip of the highest antenna, the Sears tower is the tallest building in the U.S. If the navigation warning light burns out there, you take the elevator up to about 1,500 ft., then climb the remaining couple hundred feet up the tower and replace the bulb - piece of cake, right? It's usually not that easy. The two guys in this video filmed their climb to the very top of this free-standing, 1,786-foot tower in order to replace its bulb. They latch in safety hooks during rest stop, but climb freely in-between; stops become more frequent near the top. You have to be in pretty good physical condition to do this work - which in this case is akin to crawling uphill on your hands and knees for ½ km. According to the narration, the visible horizon is 55 miles away at the top.

d = sqrt (h2 + 2rh)

r = radius of earth (mean) = 20,903,520 feet
h = height of tower = 1,786 feet

d = 273,259 feet = 51.8 miles (83.3 km)


Videos for Engineers - RF CafeThis collection of video and a few audio files represents files that have been featured on the RF Cafe homepage. Every week or so a new file is added that should be of interest to RF Cafe visitors.

All Videos for Engineers archive pages:
| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 |
| 16 | 17 | 18 |19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 |

Please send me an e-mail if you have a good subject. Note: "Videos for Engineers" formerly went by the name "Cool Videos."