Electronics World Cover,TOC,and list of posted Popular Electronics articles QST Radio & TV News Radio-Craft Radio-Electronics Short Wave Craft Wireless World About RF Cafe RF Cafe Homepage RF Cafe in Morse Code Google Search of RF Cafe website Sitemap Electronics Equations Mathematics Equations Equations physics Manufacturers & distributors Engineer Jobs Twitter LinkedIn Crosswords Engineering Humor Kirt's Cogitations Engineering Event Calendar RF Engineering Quizzes AN/MPN-14 Radar 5CCG Notable Quotes App Notes Calculators Education Magazines Software,T-Shirts,Coffee Mugs Articles - submitted by RF Cafe visitors Simulators Technical Writings RF Cafe Archives Test Notes Wireless System Designer RF Stencils for Visio Shapes for Word Search RF Cafe Sitemap Advertising Facebook RF Cafe Forums Thank you for visiting RF Cafe!

VNA Reference Plane - RF Cafe Forums

The original RF Cafe Forums were shut down in late 2012 due to maintenance issues. Original posts:

Amateur Radio | Antennas | Circuits & Components | Systems | Test & Measurement


FL Techie
 Post subject: VNA Reference Plane
Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 9:17 am 
 
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2004 1:51 pm
Posts: 26
I need some clarification about the reference plane for on-wafer calibration & measurement using VNA and probe Station.

Can someone please tell me what determines the reference plane? How is it defined? Does it have to do with the dimensions of DUT and calibration artifacts?

Any info will be appreciated.


- Brad


 
   
 
balajisu
 Post subject: vna reference plane
Posted: Sun Oct 09, 2005 6:57 pm 
 
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2005 5:54 pm
Posts: 28
Location: Germantown,MD
Hi

We choose the reference planes to calibrate out the additional structures like cables,pads,transmission lines etc., so that the data that we measure would be the data for the DUT being measured.

Once reference planes are fixed we can use appropriate math to calculate the S-parameters of the structure within the reference planes.

hope i answered your query in the right direction


 
  
 
jvmagnus
 Post subject: 50 ohm reference question
Posted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 6:21 pm 
 
Lieutenant

Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 6:08 pm
Posts: 1
Location: Portland, Maine
I need to calibrate a test fixture at a probe test point. I've built the fixture and the DUT looks about like an 0805 chip resistor (it isn't a resistor, but the physical size is representative). So, I need a similar chip which measures 50 ohms so I can calibrate the whole structure. I've read that 50 ohm chip resistors are not good things to use for this, and are only useful to about 500 MHz. I'm working around 1GHz. Anyone have ideas on how I can do this?

Thanks,
John


 
   
 
Yariv3G
 Post subject: Re: 50 ohm reference question
Posted: Mon Apr 03, 2006 4:39 am 
 
Captain

Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 4:06 am
Posts: 8
Hi John,
Did you got a reply on your question? I might facing the same issue. We build our own calibration structure but know I want to evaluate them against commercial calibration structures. Did you consider to order calibration structures according to your footprint? Can you send me the article that suggests not to use in high frequency such a resistor?
Best Regards
Yariv3G

_________________
R&S RF Application Engineer


 
   
 
ConstantWave
 Post subject: Re: VNA Reference Plane
Posted: Mon Oct 11, 2010 11:14 am 
 
Lieutenant

Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 9:52 am
Posts: 1
You might want to look at our product, Spectro VNA. Using Time Domain Substitution, you can move your reference plane to anywhere that you can temporarily create a short.


 
   
 
SunshineDesign
 Post subject: Re: VNA Reference Plane
Posted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 3:33 pm 
 
Colonel

Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2008 11:35 pm
Posts: 30
Location: Ramona, CA
I recommend reading the Agilent app notes 8510-52 (PN5956-4352) and 8510-8A (PN5091-3645). The first is specifying calibration standards and the 2nd is using TRL standards for On-Wafer measurements. The calibration reference plane is defined by the physical structures and the definitions for the standards. It is typically set by the offset length of the thru, short and open. The TRL cal is better than SOLT (Short, Open, Load and Thru) for On-Wafer, but is suseptable to dispersion effects on GaAs below 1GHz and the lines become reactive. Agilent recommended LRM as the Load sets the reference impedance and On_wafer test results will be much better. Again the cal kit definition along with the physical structures will determine the reference plane. Also if using LRM be sure to measure the resistance of the loads and put into the cal kit so the measurment plane impedance is properly defined. The reference plane is usually either of two methods. In some cal kits they define the reference plane to be at the halfway point on the thru. The second and more typically used is to de-embed the reference plane back to some point (connection ground plane) or the probe tips or some other point on the launch structure or out on the line (mid point) for mechanical fixtures. I've used all the methods and it depends on what I am measuring which method I use.

_________________
Sunshine Design Engineering Services






Posted  11/12/2012

RF Cafe Software

   Wireless System Designer - RF Cafe
Wireless System Designer

RF & EE Symbols Word
RF Stencils for Visio
Calculator Workbook
RF Workbench
Smith Chartâ„¢ for Visio
Smith Chartâ„¢ for Excel

About RF Cafe

Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe WebmasterCopyright
1996 - 2022
Webmaster:
Kirt Blattenberger,
 BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The Internet was still largely an unknown entity at the time and not much was available in the form of WYSIWYG ...

All trademarks, copyrights, patents, and other rights of ownership to images and text used on the RF Cafe website are hereby acknowledged.

My Hobby Website:
 AirplanesAndRockets.com

Try Using SEARCH
to Find What You Need. 
There are 1,000s of Pages Indexed on RF Cafe !

height-line