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seeking millimeter wave collaborators for NASA research prop - RF Cafe Forums

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 Post subject: seeking millimeter wave collaborators for NASA research prop
Posted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:43 pm 

Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 1:03 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Oregon, USA
There is an open NASA / NIAC BAA for game changing technologies, and there is some interest in wireless power transmission.

1) how can we increase / maximize DC to RF conversion efficiencies (35 - 350 GHz)?

2) what power efficiencies might be possible in the short term, medium term and long term.

3) About what level of investment would be required to improve device and chip conversion efficiencies ? Over what time frame ?

4) what technical approaches might there be ?

5) for an example of out of the box thinking: I hear that the losses in millimeter wave MMIC chips are a combinationbof dielectric losses and skin effect dissipation in conductors.

In the case of the latter, do you think there might be potential tobreduce losses via employing superconductors (instead of gold/silver) ?

Since about 1993, the highest temperature superconductor is a ceramic material consisting of thallium, mercury, copper, barium, calcium and
oxygen (HgBa2Ca2Cu3O8+δ) with Tc = 138 K.

There could be funding via NAIC BAA to pursue such research.

Best regards,

Charles F Radley - Assoc Fellow AIAA
USA Telephone: +1-551-579-4686
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Google: CFRJLR

Posted  11/12/2012