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Hello to all the RF engineers of the world! - RF Cafe Forums

Because of the high maintenance needed to monitor and filter spammers from the RF Cafe Forums, I decided that it would be best to just archive the pages to make all the good information posted in the past available for review. It is unfortunate that the scumbags of the world ruin an otherwise useful venue for people wanting to exchanged useful ideas and views. It seems that the more formal social media like Facebook pretty much dominate this kind of venue anymore anyway, so if you would like to post something on RF Cafe's Facebook page, please do.

Below are all of the forum threads, including all the responses to the original posts.


 Post subject: Hello to all the RF engineers of the world!
Posted: Wed Aug 27, 2003 7:13 pm 
 
Lieutenant

Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 7:06 pm
Posts: 3
I salute you. We seem to be an endangered species.

How has the economical downturn effect you career wise?

We saw a wave of redundancies across the UK, labs and companies closed down.

So I thought it was a good time to study.

How are you coping?


 
   
 
 Post subject: Re:
Posted: Sat Aug 30, 2003 6:48 pm 
 
Captain
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2003 6:43 pm
Posts: 12
Location: U.K.
Doing OK here for now alright. The boys at the pub been speaking of layoffs. Let's hope it's not contagious!

:wink: Ralph


 
   
 
 Post subject: What is happening in our field
Posted: Sat Sep 13, 2003 10:40 am 
 
Lieutenant

Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 7:06 pm
Posts: 3
Isn't it a strange coincidence... that of all the RF engineers in the world, a Brit replies to my message on this quiet messageboard! And so soon after my post.

No really, I heard it from my ex-boss , who is now freelancing, that RF engineering jobs have dried up in the UK.

Maybe the industry is waiting, for that crucial quantum leap to happen...

A change in the way we think radio about signalling, a better understanding of materials in general, a new way of looking at radio wave transmissions...these might be all we need for that great breakthrough...


 
   
 
 Post subject: Sticking together
Posted: Mon Sep 15, 2003 8:14 am 
 
Captain
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2003 6:43 pm
Posts: 12
Location: U.K.
Not so strange that I should monitor this "sleepy forum." There is not much in the way of similar posting boards here in Her Majesty's domain, so I'll check here on occasion.

The workday is about over for me, while my American compatriots begin their day of slaving abroad. The company's many offices in the U.S. need to stop arranging meeting when I'm readying to leave for the day and they are getting their first tea (or coffee I suppose). :wink:

- Ralph


 
   
 
 Post subject: RF Engineering
Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2004 9:35 pm 
Greetings Livia, Ralph,
I have great respect for RF Engineers, Analog thinkers, and any similar type of persons involved with EM. "Endangered species" as I just read (pretty funny, sad as well, unfortunately.). Ralph, Livia, and haven't had a chance to view neither's profiles, so I will ask: what do you do in your positions, if I may ask? Are you involved in wave propagation, field testing, design work, or a mix of all? I read that atleast one of you have decided to hit the books once again. What are you concentrating on? Are you targeting some part of the RF industry you feel has more signs of life or growth potential? I myself will revisit schooling soon and want to specialize in some aspect of telecommunications. I'd like both of your takes, if you could, on the situation, now that some time has passed since your last posts. Thanks!

Hector.


 
  
 
 Post subject:
Posted: Mon Apr 12, 2004 5:02 pm 
 
Colonel
 

Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:50 pm
Posts: 33
Location: South Florida
Well I'm not an engineer but I am an Rf Tech and this looks like a good place to introduce myself.

My name is Jon Zane. I work for DMT USA owned by DMT Italy. Primarily broadcast equipment so I get to work on the big stuff. It's fun and I love what I do but frustrating at times. I am still looking for something better. Possibly a company willing to invest in my career.

I hope I'm not in a dying field, I'm only 30yrs old and I would like to make a career of this.

Nice to meet you all. I hope to share some good information here.

_________________
KC2SHO


 
   
 
 Post subject: What I curently do, RF, Broadcasting
Posted: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:11 pm 
Hello Jon (KC2SHO),
Hector (Serrano) here. I cannot claim to be a true engineer just yet. I hold a degree in electrical engineering, a bachelor's, but don't hold any licenses or have solid experience in a particular industry. I currently hold a position as an "associate" electrical engineer for an environmental engineering firm. For the past year I have been doing alot of drawing. CAD work, ACAD2000 to be precise. In my quest for an RF engineering position, I have run into and read a few job descriptions for RF/microwave Technicians. The work sounds great. Quite a learning experience, if you land one.

You mentioned Broadcast equipment. Do you use waveform monitors and vectorscopes? If this is the frustrating part you're refering to, I think I felt that at times, as well. I worked at a Television Studio back in the '91-'94 time frame. I remember having "genlock" problems with studio cameras and using a Tek scope to aid in fixing the problem of positioning the waveforms (from the camera and the main synch signal) in the same place on the grid. My boss was experienced enough were he didn't need the scopes. The bump (or lack of) between both images was enough for him. I thought it was amazing and wanted to learn more about the field, electronics, scopes, you name it. Since then I wanted to revisit that problem and found the following from tek (great site):

http://www.tek.com/Measurement/cgi-bin/ ... television

Broadcasting, from what I have been reading, is not a dying field. Broadcasters are finding ways to deliver more than just the television signal to homes. If I remember correctly, internet delivery and other similar data capabilities are being put into place because of the nature of what broadcsting is: single-to-multipoint link(s). Do you know if your company has gone to NAB (National Association of Broadcasters)? It's an annual convention that you'd find very interesting, given the opportunity to attend, if you haven't. With the exhibits, forums, literature, and more, I would say that would be a good start for your current company to invest in you.
Good Luck, Hector.


 
  
 
 Post subject: Re: What I curently do, RF, Broadcasting
Posted: Tue Apr 13, 2004 5:21 pm 
 
Colonel
 

Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:50 pm
Posts: 33
Location: South Florida
Hector wrote:
Hello Jon (KC2SHO),
Hector (Serrano) here. I cannot claim to be a true engineer just yet. I hold a degree in electrical engineering, a bachelor's, but don't hold any licenses or have solid experience in a particular industry. I currently hold a position as an "associate" electrical engineer for an environmental engineering firm. For the past year I have been doing alot of drawing. CAD work, ACAD2000 to be precise. In my quest for an RF engineering position, I have run into and read a few job descriptions for RF/microwave Technicians. The work sounds great. Quite a learning experience, if you land one.


Hi Hector, Sounds like we have similar interest. I don't hold any real licenses or degrees. I have been a natural for all things technical since I was just wee lad. It's in the bloodline. I have lots of mixed technical experience. I'm the true jack of all trades. I spent 5 years as Network Technician before I got back into electronics and RF. I'm much happier now and still doing the computer stuff on the side.

Quote:
You mentioned Broadcast equipment. Do you use waveform monitors and vectorscopes? If this is the frustrating part you're refering to, I think I felt that at times, as well. I worked at a Television Studio back in the '91-'94 time frame. I remember having "genlock" problems with studio cameras and using a Tek scope to aid in fixing the problem of positioning the waveforms (from the camera and the main synch signal) in the same place on the grid. My boss was experienced enough were he didn't need the scopes. The bump (or lack of) between both images was enough for him. I thought it was amazing and wanted to learn more about the field, electronics, scopes, you name it. Since then I wanted to revisit that problem and found the following from tek (great site):


I don't see studio equipment really. We are a analog and digital transmitter manufacturer so it's more the equipment after the studio feed. Primarily RF. As far as analog video I use something a little more advanced then just a waveform monitor for the video signal. It's the Tektronics VM700A and I use it only to check the tranmitters output. In other words I only look at the down converted signal. The video signal itself and the non linarities associated with it can be a bit frustrating some times but it's not really what frustrates me. I am the only Technician here in the US. I have no mentors. If I have questions I have to call Italy. When I need help it's just not there. I've done well so far though. Everything I have repaired or tuned in the last year and a half have not come back to haunt me. I can learn anything, but I yearn for the training to be an expert... the technician other people come to when they need help. Someday, Someday...

Quote:
Broadcasting, from what I have been reading, is not a dying field. Broadcasters are finding ways to deliver more than just the television signal to homes. If I remember correctly, internet delivery and other similar data capabilities are being put into place because of the nature of what broadcsting is: single-to-multipoint link(s). Do you know if your company has gone to NAB (National Association of Broadcasters)? It's an annual convention that you'd find very interesting, given the opportunity to attend, if you haven't. With the exhibits, forums, literature, and more, I would say that would be a good start for your current company to invest in you.
Good Luck, Hector.


I hope your right. I like what I do and I want to do it for the rest of my life. I went to my first NAB last year and I'll be at this years which is next week!

_________________
KC2SHO





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