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China behind the N. Korean nuke - RF Cafe Forums

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 Post subject: China behind the N. Korean nuke
Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 8:45 am 
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 4:10 pm
Posts: 8
Location: Tennessee
Well folks what do you think of our wonderful "Trading Partner" China now that the little pot-bellied dictator from N. Korea has (presumably) detonated a nuke? Even the most liberal wrold new agencies are reporting that China funded and provided materials/expertise fo rthe work.

But wait, in the 1990s our own president gave them the equipment for producing the fissionable material, along with a couple billion dollars of aid money to feed Kim Jung Il's starving people, and oil to heat their wretched huts.

Come to think of it, is China any more responsible for the advancement of N. Korea's nuke program that we are? If we hadn't given them the "nunclear power plant" technology and hardware, and even enriched uranium with wich to begin, where would they be today? They would have had to sneak stuff in on the black market, because we would have objected vehemently if China had given them the means.

There's something to think about. We gave the Communist dictator of N. Korea everything he needed to conduct yesterday's test. Now we express surprise that he did it. What next - transfer all of our semiconductor, aerospace, medical and biological technology and turnkey equipment to China and then act surprised when they use it against us? Oh, wait, that's what we're doing now.

Don't forget that our own Loral company exported hardware and engineers to China in the 1990s also to fix the stabilizations problem on their long range missiles (oh, right, satellite launchers) because they kept crashing into the ocean or China deserts. Now, using our technology, their Long Dongs can hit any American city with precision. Google "loral china rocket schwartz" for all the info you can stomach. Thanks Loral.

Poor us. We the people are getting exactly what we're asking for in elections - cheap prices at Wal-Mart today in exchange for eventual doom. Have a good day.

 Post subject:
Posted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 8:11 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 7:50 am
Posts: 5
Hi Snerdley,

I think unfortunately that as you say we have created the situation with N. Korea by appeasing Kim Jung Sicko back in the 1990s. How the U.S. could have handed over a light water nuclear reactor, provide enriched uranium for fuel, and given them millions of barrels of oil and hundreds of millions of dollars is beyond my ability to comprehend.

I'm no big fan of Bush, but it's not right to blame his administration for this problem that Bill Clinton, Sandy Burglar (aka the guy who stuffs national archive secret papers into his underware so the 9/11 commission won't see them), and Albright are responsible for.

Even the stammering Bush made sense yesterday when he pointed out that he's being criticized for refusing direct talks with N. Korea and insisting on the 6-party format, when for years he's been criticized for "going it alone" in foreign policy. I've been a Democrat all my 43 years (well since old enough to vote anyway), but in the last decade I've had to hold my nose when pulling the lever on the voting machine. My guys have lost all credibility maybe more than the GOP. I think the entire system is so corrupt that We the People can't trust any of them anymore.

I do have to agree though that my party is willing to do anything to get back in power - even if it means sacrificing the security of the American people. I think I'll be switching to Independent after this year, and will probalby not even vote next month.


Posted  11/12/2012