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radiation boundary - RF Cafe Forums

Because of the high maintenance needed to monitor and filter spammers from the RF Cafe Forums, I decided that it would be best to just archive the pages to make all the good information posted in the past available for review. It is unfortunate that the scumbags of the world ruin an otherwise useful venue for people wanting to exchanged useful ideas and views. It seems that the more formal social media like Facebook pretty much dominate this kind of venue anymore anyway, so if you would like to post something on RF Cafe's Facebook page, please do.

Below are all of the forum threads, including all the responses to the original posts.


 Post subject: radiation boundary
Posted: Sat Jan 07, 2006 10:48 am 
Hi,

Can anyone suggest the optimum size of the radiation boundary box for an antenna in HFSS? If I use the default radiation box, HFSS places the box at the edge of the board. In one of the manuals for an earlier version of HFSS, they have used a box that is quarter-wavelength bigger than the board on 3 sides for a patch antenna, while in the manual for version 9, the box is a lot closer to the patch.

As expected, my results vary depending on the size of the radiation boundary box. Can anyone help me on this?

Karthik.


 
  
 
 Post subject:
Posted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:53 am 
I have a feeling that a quarter-wave is pretty close... for microstrip circuits I try and keep the airbox 10x the substrate thickness - i.e. 2.5 mm for a 10 mil alumina substrate... so while I'm not sure where the optimum placement is, you could also try and keep moving the box further and further away from your antenna until the results don't change very much.


 
  
 
 Post subject:
Posted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 12:52 pm 
I have a dipole in front of a ground plane. If I take the 'substrate thickness' to be the total depth of the arrangement - i.e, pcb thickness plus the distance between the dipole and the ground plane (this total thickness works out to roughly 20mm), my air box is still 8x this size. However, my results still vary. The gain varies by about half a dB, and as long as the box is symmetrically big on all sides, the pattern doesnt change. The input impedance varies quite a bit.

Another question was regarding interpreting the results in HFSS. When you calculate the far-field characterisitics, HFSS gives results in terms of Directivity, Gain and 'Realized Gain'. What does 'realized gain' mean? I was confused, since, if you look at the efficiency factor, it appears this is calculated using Directivity and Gain and not realized gain.


 
  
 
 Post subject:
Posted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:44 pm 
Sorry, I don't know about the realized gain...


 
  
 
 Post subject:
Posted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 4:29 pm 
 
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:07 pm
Posts: 28
Def. Realized Gain:
When mismatch loss occurs, as it usually
does, this loss must be subtracted from the
power gain of the antenna to yield realized
gain. Realized gain is important to the systems
engineer, for it reveals how much signal
will be available at the input to the receiver
for a given field strength.

See: http://www.wj.com/pdf/technotes/Direct_antennas.pdf


 
   
 
 Post subject:
Posted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 4:45 pm 
Thanks!!




Posted  11/12/2012
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