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Network Engineers' Humor - RF Cafe Forums

The original RF Cafe Forums were shut down in late 2012 due to maintenance issues. Please visit the new and improved RF Cafe Forums that were created in September of 2015. Unlike with the old forums where users registered individually, the new forums use a common User Name and Password so anyone can post without needing to create an account. Please find the current User Name and Password on the RF Cafe homepage. Thanks for your participation.

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 Post subject: Network Engineers' Humor
Posted: Sun Aug 10, 2008 11:16 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2003 2:02 pm
Posts: 878
Location: Erie, PA

If you are at all interested in how small businesses run, get started, succeed, fail, etc., then reading through Inc. magazine is definitely recommended. A fellow by the name of Joel Spolsky writes a monthly colum titled, How Hard Could It Be? Joel is the co-founder and CEO of Fog Creek Software. His wit and humor are strewn throughout his columns, which makes them the first thing I read every month.

In the August 2008 edition, this passage is particularly funny (the column is about the inefficiency of regimented corporate policies - Starbucks in this case):

A network engineer would say this was a situation of "same bandwidth, lower latency" and then probably launch into a story about how the post office, mailing millions of DVDs (and a few letters) around the world every day, has the highest bandwidth of any network on earth, with far greater capacity than the biggest fiber-optic backbone, but with high latency -- so you wouldn't want to use it for, say, telephony. And this would be extremely hilarious to the network engineer. That's the kind of joke they tell.


Here is the complete article: ... ystem.html


- Kirt Blattenberger :smt024
RF Cafe Progenitor & Webmaster

Posted  11/12/2012